Mar
10
Thu
Women Making Moves: Gender & the Changing Landscape of Transportation @ La Kretz Innovation Campus
Mar 10 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

We invite you to join the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and the Institute on Transportation Studies to discuss the successes and consequences of strong women leading an industry like transportation, which has traditionally been male dominated. We’ve experienced the rise of female leaders both nationally and locally. What does this mean? How will it change the way we build transportation? How does it affect the way we talk about it?

Featured Panelists:

Tamika Butler

Executive Director, LA County Bicycle Coalition

Lisa Schweitzer, PhD ‘04

Associate Professor, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy

Chandini Singh, MA UP ‘10

Policy Analyst at PLACE Program, LA County Dept. of Public Health

Moderated by Martin Wachs, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Urban Planning

Presented in partnership with La Kretz Innovation Campus and CicLAvia, Inc.

— RSVP Via Eventbrite 

Apr
6
Wed
Dr. Gen Giuliano: Spatial Dynamics of the Logistics Industry in California Metropolitan Areas @ UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, Rm 2343
Apr 6 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Throughout the 2016 Winter and Spring quarters, the Department of Urban Planning, the Lewis Center and Institute of Transportation Studies will present the Harvey S. Perloff lectures on Urban Goods Movement. Please join us for part three of a five lecture series. Light refreshments will be served.

Spatial Dynamics of the Logistics Industry in California Metropolitan Areas

Urban planners are increasingly concerned about “logistics sprawl”, or the decentralization of logistics operations in metropolitan areas. Like urban sprawl, the underlying hypothesis is that increased separation of producers and consumers leads to more truck travel, and hence to increased air pollution, fuel consumption, and GHG emissions. It is not clear that truck travel would increase with decentralization. Scale economies or expansion to national and international markets could make decentralized locations more efficient. Before considering the impacts of decentralization, it is important to examine whether decentralization is a consistent spatial trend.

Evidence of decentralization is limited.  We examine changes in the spatial pattern of warehousing and distribution activities for the four largest California metropolitan areas, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Sacramento, and San Diego, using  ZIP Code Business Patterns data for 2003 and 2013.  We develop measures of decentralization and concentration.  Our results are mixed.  When using establishment counts, only Los Angeles shows a consistent pattern of decentralization.  There is more evidence of decentralization when using employment counts, which is consistent with larger scale facilities being built at the periphery.  Spatial patterns for the largest metro areas are quite different from those of the smaller metro areas.  We surmise that higher development density and associated land prices push W&D activity to more distant areas.  In contrast, W&D location in San Diego and Sacramento is relatively closer to employment, population, and the CBD.  The decentralization that is observed is likely linked to domestic and international trade, for which access to local markets is less important.

 

Featuring:  Professor Genevieve Giuliano, the 2016 Harvey S. Perloff Professor

Genevieve Giuliano, Perloff Scholar and Margaret and John Ferraro Chair in Effective Local Government and Director, METRANS Transportation Center at the University of Southern California.

The Perloff Professorship was created to honor the memory of Harvey S. Perloff, a noted economist and urban planner who was the Dean of the UCLA School of Architecture and Urban Planning when the Department of Urban Planning grew to maturity and prominence. The Perloff Professorship brings truly distinguished visiting scholars and practitioners of planning to our community to share their visions and insights with us. This year we are proud to welcome Genevieve Giuliano as the Perloff Professor  

Genevieve Giuliano is Professor and Senior Associate Dean of Research and Technology in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of Southern California. She is also Director of the METRANS joint USC and California State University at Long Beach Transportation Center. In 2009 she was named the Margaret and John Ferraro Chair in Effective Local Government for her work in regional transportation policy. 

Professor Giuliano is a geographer who has co-authored several editions of the well-known and widely- used textbook, Transportation Geography. Her research focuses on relationships between land use and transportation, transportation policy analysis, and information technology applications in transportation. She recently has been exploring the improvement of research on transportation systems through the application of “big data.” As a researcher she has excelled at bringing to the field of urban planning a growing understanding of the importance of goods movement and of addressing freight in urban policymaking.

She has authored more than 140 publications and serves on the editorial boards of Urban Studies and the Journal of Transport Policy. She is a past chair of the Transportation Research Board Executive Committee and is a National Associate of the National Academies. She received the TRB William Carey Award for Distinguished Service and was honored by the TRB as the Thomas B. Deen Distinguished Lecturer. Professor Giuliano also has also received the Transportation Research Forum Outstanding Researcher Award and the Council of University Transportation Centers Distinguished Contribution award.

Apr
18
Mon
Dr. Allison Yoh: Investing in Freight, Creative Funding for Port Infrastructure @ UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, Rm 4357
Apr 18 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Throughout the 2016 Winter and Spring quarters,  the Department of Urban Planning, the Lewis Center and Institute of Transportation Studies will present the Harvey S. Perloff lectures on Urban Goods Movement. Please join us for part four of a five lecture series. Light refreshments will be served.

Investing in Freight Creative Funding for Port Infrastructure

Southern California is home to the nation’s busiest container seaport complex.  Combined, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach move over $270 billion worth of goods, destined to reach every congressional district in the nation.  With the growth in mega-vessels and shipping alliances, the Port of Long Beach anticipates significant capacity challenges as a result of peaking demands on our land-side transportation infrastructure.  This presentation examines the Port of Long Beach’s efforts to replace the Gerald Desmond Bridge – which carries ten percent of the nation’s waterborne containers – as a case study for funding critical infrastructure to connect seaports with inland markets.  

 

Featuring: Allison Yoh, Director of Transportation Planning, Port of Long Beach

Dr. Allison Yoh serves as Transportation Planning Directror, in Long Beach and manages the development of transportation policies that balance Port interests and needs with those of the region, state, and nation.  She is also responsible for working with a range of internal and external, and public and private stakeholders to facilitate the integration of transportation, environment, and energy policy related to goods movement. As part of her work in policy development and interagency coordination, she manages the Port’s active transportation program.  Prior to joining the Port in June 2013, Dr. Yoh served as Associate Director of two research centers at UCLA – the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies and the Institute of Transportation Studies and served two years as a mayoral appointee to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro) Board of Directors. Dr. Yoh was also an adjunct researcher at the RAND Corporation. She received her bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley and her Master’s and Doctoral degrees in Urban Planning from UCLA. 

Transportation Planning Lecture Series: Madeline Brozen – Holistically Measuring Road System Performance, Complete Streets @ 2343 Public Affairs Building
Apr 18 @ 2:00 pm – 3:20 pm
Apr
20
Wed
Transportation Planning Lecture Series: Martin Wachs – Bullet Trains or Buses? Understanding & Planning For Intercity Travel @ 2343 Public Affairs Building
Apr 20 @ 2:00 pm – 3:20 pm
Apr
25
Mon
Transportation Planning Lecture Series: Hasan Ikhrata – Southern California’s Transportation System: Can We Keep Trade in Motion? @ 2343 Public Affairs Building
Apr 25 @ 2:00 pm – 3:20 pm
Apr
27
Wed
The Future of Public Transit: The 9th Annual UCLA Downtown Forum @ The California Endowment
Apr 27 @ 8:00 am – 3:00 pm

Visit the forum webite for a full program

The Future of Public Transit

9th Annual UCLA Downtown Los Angeles Forum on Transportation, Land Use and the Environment

Presented by the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies and the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies

Strong public and political support for public transit is abounding across the United States. The Los Angeles region, by some measures, is seen as the poster child for this enthusiasm; home to the largest group of public works projects in the United States. But new transit project construction is only a part of what will shape the future. Transit managers need to understand their markets and competition, and how both might be expected to change in the years ahead.

The 9th Annual UCLA Downtown Los Angeles Forum on Transportation, Land Use and the Environment will focus on the future of public transit. Speakers at the event will provide attendees an understanding of who transit customers are, how large societal shifts are likely to change the characteristics of current and potential riders, and how transportation planning and policy should think about responding. As such, the morning includes two panels; (1) speakers discussing demographic and technological trends and how these trends are likely to shape public transit ridership and (2) presentations of how agencies can respond to these changing preferences, technologies and demographics. The forum will conclude with a keynote address from the former FTA acting administrator and soon-to-return to Los Angeles, Therese McMillan, to tie together the themes of the day and reflect on how public transit adds value to the transportation network and to society in Los Angeles and other U.S cities. 

Attendees can expect a content-rich program and time to network with fellow transportation professionals. Those who plan, advise and think about public transit will find the 2016 UCLA Downtown Forum a highly worthwhile experience. 

Speakers and talks include:

  • Evelyn Blumenberg, Professor and Chair, UCLA Department of Urban Planning “Taste for Transit: Youth, immigrants, and transit use trends in the U.S”

  • Emily Castor, Director of Transportation Policy, Lyft “Friend or Foe? Exploring new business models for transit agency/private sector collaborations to attract more passengers”

  • Kurt Luhrsen, Vice President of Planning, Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, “What if we start over from scratch? How Houston is reimagining its transit system.”

  • Phillip Washington, CEO, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, “New trains, new services, new networks, new fares, new partners… Metro’s strategies for building ridership in the years ahead”

Please stay tuned to the forum website for program updates.

AICP credits available.

Sponsored by:

Home

May
16
Mon
Transportation Planning Lecture Series: Genevieve Giuliano – Evaluating Buses Versus Rail in Urban Public Transit Planning @ 2343 Public Affairs Building
May 16 @ 2:00 pm – 3:20 pm
May
23
Mon
Transportation Planning Lecture Series: Emily Castor – The Rise of Transportation Network Companies @ 2343 Public Affairs Building
May 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:20 pm
Mar
9
Thu
Innovative Mobility Webinar Part II
Mar 9 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

FOR WHOM THE ROAD TOLLS: INNOVATIONS IN TRANSPORTATION USER FEES

March 9th, 2017 / 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Register to receive the webinar address via email

Description: 

The Road User Pilot Program is a statewide test of road charging, a means for paying for road maintenance in which users pay based on the distance or time they are using the road in place of the taxes on fuel they purchase. The study, which originated from Governor Brown’s 2014 signing of SB 1077, involves 5,000 volunteers testing one of five mileage reporting methods that could one day replace the gas tax as the way in which we pay for road maintenance. This session discusses what the pilot program has discovered so far, what its political future is, and what the alternatives are.

Speaker: 

Martin Wachs, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Urban Planning